Scott can't get enough of London Stadium

``CAN I go back out there? I want to race some more.’’

With those words middle distance runner Brad Scott ended his London Paralympic campaign with a perfect score – a medal in both his events.

He took silver in the 1500m (T37) final Monday night to add to his bronze in 800m on Saturday. Both times he had to bow to the incredible running talents of Ireland’s Michael McKillop, the current world record holder for the two events.

But in the 1500m Scott (ACT) held off Tunisia’s Mohamed Charmi, who finished ahead of him for silver in the 800m.

``As soon as I felt him pushing on my shoulder I knew I had something left in the tank and I just kicked,’’ Scott said. ``Then with 200 left, the tanks was emptying but I thought `You know what, I’ll give it my all’.’’
 
Many would not envy running against McKillop because it most often a race for silver or bronze due to his substantial talent. The Irishman started giving his victory wave to the crowd 80 metres from the line he was that far in front of the pack.

``I want to race him more because he gives me something to strive for,’’ Scott said. ``I’m just so looking forward to the next four years and going to Rio and I tell you what, I want to be on his shoulders with 100 (metres) to go and kick.’’

Scott is at his second Paralympics and now has two silvers and a bronze in the 800m and 1500m. His program for London is now ended but he wants to get back out amongst the atmosphere in the Olympic Park Stadium.

``Mate, this crowd is amazing. And the knowledge of the crowd with athletics is phenomenal. In Beijing there really wasn’t that experience of our sport and the knowledge.

``But here it’s been amazing and you couldn’t ask for much more. I want to get back out there again. I’ll take this experience as a great memory with me all the way to Rio (2016 Paralympics).’’

The 24-year-old has only raced the distance competitively nine times since deciding with is coach Iryna Dvoskina that he had some talent over the mile.

``With her tutelage and her knowledge, she made sure I could do it because without her I don’t think I could have done the two (events),’’ Scott said. ``She’s like my second mum. A lot of people don’t say that about their coaches but she treats us like our own children and she would do anything for her athletes.’’

With Dvoskina’s encouragement, Scott said he felt no pressure stepping up into the 1500m when the IPC decided to run it in London. The event was not on the Beijing program – just the 800m.

``I felt no pressure tonight because I’m already a London medallist. I knew I had a major opportunity here (1500m) so I decided to go out there, run my race and have some fun. If I get another medal I thought that’d be awesome, but if I didn’t I already had more bronze.’’

There were 16 gold medals decided in track and field on Monday, but Australia was only in five. However, Scott’s silver and Russell Short’s bronze in shot put (F11-12)  ensured a solid green-and-gold presence.

Team manager Andrew Faichney applauded Scott’s attitude and application to taking on someone like McKillop, who is to the cerebral palsy classes what Oscar Pistorius is to leg amputees, or Kurt Fearnley to wheelchair racing.

``It’s quite a strong event with the big fella (McKillop) out the front,’’ Faichney said. ``So Brad held his nerve and ran a very strong race.’’

In other results, Tim Sullivan (Vic) ran a season best time in the 400m (T38) to just miss out on the medals with a 5th placing.

In two women’s field events, Brydee Moore (Vic) finished 10th in javelin (F52-53-33-34) and Stephanie Schweitzer (NSW) finished 4th in long jump (F20).

Schweitzer became the first Australian athlete with an intellectual disability to compete in track and field at a Games since Sydney. The ID athletes were reintroduced to the IPC program after a 12-year ban because of classification issues with Spanish basketballers at the Sydney 2000 Paralympics. 

``Steph’s jump was pretty good. It’s about the distance where she’s been for a little while,’’ Faichney said. ``But to be able to get that reasonable performance in front of that sort of huge crowd, she should actually be quite satisfied.’’

In other news, the Paralympics are over too early for 200m bronze medallist Simon Patmore. The 25-year-old Queenslander tore his hamstring in Sunday’s T46 final.

MRI scans taken on Monday showed a grade two tear to his left leg muscle, which means a six to eight week rehabilitation. Patmore was due to run the 100m and the 4x100m relay for amputees and coach Brett Jones said he was finding the news hard to deal with.

``He’s elated with his medal but at the same time he’s absolutely shattered he can’t run the 100,’’ Jones said. ``He’s trained so hard for both it’s just very disappointing for him.

``He tore his hamstring at the 40-metre mark but pushed on for bronze. We’re all incredibly proud of him for what he did. He is an incredibly resilient and tough character to be able to do that.’’

Faichney said he was looking at Michael Roeger (SA) or Matthew Silocks (Vic) – both 800m runners – to fill the spot.

By Margie McDonald

Posted 03/09/2012

``CAN I go back out there? I want to race some more.’’

 

With those words middle distance runner Brad Scott ended his London Paralympic campaign with a perfect score – a medal in both his events.

 

He took silver in the 1500m (T37) final Monday night to add to his bronze in 800m on Saturday. Both times he had to bow to the incredible running talents of Ireland’s Michael McKillop, the current world record holder for the two events.

 

But in the 1500m Scott (ACT) held off Tunisia’s Mohamed Charmi, who finished ahead of him for silver in the 800m.

 

``As soon as I felt him pushing on my shoulder I knew I had something left in the tank and I just kicked,’’ Scott said. ``Then with 200 left, the tanks was emptying but I thought `You know what, I’ll give it my all’.’’

  

Many would not envy running against McKillop because it most often a race for silver or bronze due to his substantial talent. The Irishman started giving his victory wave to the crowd 80 metres from the line he was that far in front of the pack.

 

``I want to race him more because he gives me something to strive for,’’ Scott said. ``I’m just so looking forward to the next four years and going to Rio and I tell you what, I want to be on his shoulders with 100 (metres) to go and kick.’’

 

Scott is at his second Paralympics and now has two silvers and a bronze in the 800m and 1500m. His program for London is now ended but he wants to get back out amongst the atmosphere in the Olympic Park Stadium.

 

``Mate, this crowd is amazing. And the knowledge of the crowd with athletics is phenomenal. In Beijing there really wasn’t that experience of our sport and the knowledge.

 

``But here it’s been amazing and you couldn’t ask for much more. I want to get back out there again. I’ll take this experience as a great memory with me all the way to Rio (2016 Paralympics).’’

 

The 24-year-old has only raced the distance competitively nine times since deciding with is coach Iryna Dvoskina that he had some talent over the mile.

 

``With her tutelage and her knowledge, she made sure I could do it because without her I don’t think I could have done the two (events),’’ Scott said. ``She’s like my second mum. A lot of people don’t say that about their coaches but she treats us like our own children and she would do anything for her athletes.’’

 

With Dvoskina’s encouragement, Scott said he felt no pressure stepping up into the 1500m when the IPC decided to run it in London. The event was not on the Beijing program – just the 800m.

 

``I felt no pressure tonight because I’m already a London medallist. I knew I had a major opportunity here (1500m) so I decided to go out there, run my race and have some fun. If I get another medal I thought that’d be awesome, but if I didn’t I already had more bronze.’’

 

There were 16 gold medals decided in track and field on Monday, but Australia was only in five. However, Scott’s silver and Russell Short’s bronze in shot put (F11-12)  ensured a solid green-and-gold presence.

 

Team manager Andrew Faichney applauded Scott’s attitude and application to taking on someone like McKillop, who is to the cerebral palsy classes what Oscar Pistorius is to leg amputees, or Kurt Fearnley to wheelchair racing.

 

``It’s quite a strong event with the big fella (McKillop) out the front,’’ Faichney said. ``So Brad held his nerve and ran a very strong race.’’

 

In other results, Tim Sullivan (Vic) ran a season best time in the 400m (T38) to just miss out on the medals with a 5th placing.

 

In two women’s field events, Brydee Moore (Vic) finished 10th in javelin (F52-53-33-34) and Stephanie Schweitzer (NSW) finished 4th in long jump (F20).

 

Schweitzer became the first Australian athlete with an intellectual disability to compete in track and field at a Games since Sydney. The ID athletes were reintroduced to the IPC program after a 12-year ban because of classification issues with Spanish basketballers at the Sydney 2000 Paralympics.  

 

``Steph’s jump was pretty good. It’s about the distance where she’s been for a little while,’’ Faichney said. ``But to be able to get that reasonable performance in front of that sort of huge crowd, she should actually be quite satisfied.’’

 

In other news, the Paralympics are over too early for 200m bronze medallist Simon Patmore. The 25-year-old Queenslander tore his hamstring in Sunday’s T46 final.

 

MRI scans taken on Monday showed a grade two tear to his left leg muscle, which means a six to eight week rehabilitation. Patmore was due to run the 100m and the 4x100m relay for amputees and coach Brett Jones said he was finding the news hard to deal with.

 

``He’s elated with his medal but at the same time he’s absolutely shattered he can’t run the 100,’’ Jones said. ``He’s trained so hard for both it’s just very disappointing for him.

 

``He tore his hamstring at the 40-metre mark but pushed on for bronze. We’re all incredibly proud of him for what he did. He is an incredibly resilient and tough character to be able to do that.’’

 

Faichney said he was looking at Michael Roeger (SA) or Matthew Silocks (Vic) – both 800m runners – to fill the spot.